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  • Adam Scartozzi

Why Talking About Suicide is Important

September is National Suicide Prevention Month. This has been a challenging year for most of us. The current social climate has added to the typical obstacles preventing healthy mental health practices. Our individual and collective mental health has been impacted not only by concerns involving health, work, school, and money, but has been complicated by the addition of social unrest around racism, the coronavirus, and social distancing measures enacted nationwide. The need to maintain social distance has given us the option to isolate from one another more easily, allowing mental health issues to develop and grow stronger. Reflecting on the relevance of factors related to suicidality and the steady growth of suicides in the general public, we are having to confront new hurdles to cultivating mental wellness.


Our individual and collective mental health has been impacted not only by concerns involving health, work, school, and money, but has been complicated by the addition of social unrest around racism, the coronavirus, and social distancing measures enacted nationwide.

According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, “suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US.”1 We know that suicide is a preventable, but why do the numbers keep climbing?


One of the most important factors in the prevalence of suicide attempts and completion is the role of silence. Suicide makes people uncomfortable. It is a topic many people believe to be taboo, preventing open and honest conversations about mental health concerns from being discussed. It is a topic that, if approached, can be accompanied by a strong fear of “saying the wrong thing” or “making it worse”. To help prevent suicide, we need to get comfortable talking about it. We must end the stigma of facing mental or emotional struggle for those of us in crisis or contemplating suicide.


To help prevent suicide, we need to get comfortable talking about it. We must end the stigma of facing mental or emotional struggle for those of us in crisis or contemplating suicide.

We must do our part to change the larger conversation involving mental health care by highlighting the courage it takes to look for help when you are hurt. Speaking clearly, honestly, and directly about mental or emotional concerns with those we love is one of the most important steps we can take to change the conversation around suicide.


Now is the time to speak up. Chat with your family or your friends. Check in on each other. Don’t be afraid to tackle the tough subjects. Share resources and offer your support.

Truly meaningful change can come about by conversation and action. Now is the time to speak up. Chat with your family or your friends. Check in on each other. Don’t be afraid to tackle the tough subjects. Share resources and offer your support. Our mental health is just as important as our physical health. Let’s help keep each other safe and do our part to prevent suicide!

Resources


National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1-800-273-8255 CHAT WITH LIFELINE


Veterans Crisis Line

1-800-273-8255 Text 838255

CHAT WITH VCL


Trans Lifeline 

877-565-8860 (US) | 877-330-6366 (CANADA)


The Trevor Project 

1-866-488-7386

References

  1. Suicide Statistics. American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, 29 July 2020, afsp.org/suicide-statistics/.

  2. Suicide Statistics. American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, 29 July 2020, afsp.org/suicide-statistics/.



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